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Beetle - Feeding Behaviour

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 Introduction:


Feeding on:Families and or Subfamilies:
ACARIPHAGOUSmites.
ALGOPHAGOUSalgae.
ANTHOPHAGOUSflowers.
ARACHNEOPHAGOUSspiders.
BRYOPHAGOUSmoss.
CERATOPHAGOUScornified tissues and hair animals.
COCCIDOPHAGOUSscale insects and parasitoids of scale insects.
COPROMYCETOPHAGOUSinhabiting feces and consuming mycetes growing inside or cultivating them for feeding.
COPROPHAGOUSexcrements, feces.Coprinae. Scarabinae.
CARPOPHAGOUSfruits and seeds.
DENDROPHAGOUStrees.
DETRITOPHAGOUSground remains of plants and animals.
DUROPHAGOUSmolluscs.Carabidae.
ENTOMONECROPHAGOUSdead arthropods.
ENTOMOPHAGOUSother insects, insectivore.
HAEMATOPHAGOUSblood.
HELICIPHAHOUSsnails.Carabidae.
HERBIPHAGOUSherbaceous plants.
HELMINTHOPHAGOUSworms.
HEMATOPHAGOUSblood.
LICHENOPHAGOUSlichens.
MALACOPHAGOUSmolluscs.
MIXOMYCETOPHAGOUSmyxomycetes fungus.
MYCETOPHAGOUSfungus.
MYCOPHAGOUSfungus.
MYRMECOPHAGOUSants, termites.
NECROPHAGOUSdead animals and their remains.
OOPHAGOUSeggs.
OPHIOPHAGOUSsnakes.
PALYNOPHAGOUSpollen.
PHLOEOPHAGOUSbark.
PHYLLOPHAGOUSleaves.
PHYTOPHAGOUSplants, herbivore.
POLLINOPHAGOUSpollen.
POLYPHAGOUSomnivore.
RHIZOPHAGOUSroots.
SAPROMYCETOPHAGOUSinhabiting decaying matter and consuming mycetes growing inside or cultivating them for feeding.
SAPROPHAGOUSdecaying organic matter.
SAPROXYLOPHAGOUSdead woodLucanidae. Prioninae.
SARCONECROPHAGOUSdead bodies of vertebrates.
SCHISOPHAGOUSground remains of plants and animals.
SPOROPHAGOUSmycete spores.
XYLOPHAGOUSwood.
ZOOMYCETOPHAGOUSfungus found on other animals.
ZOOPHAGOUSanimals.

Kleptoparasitism or cleptoparasitism (literally, parasitism by theft) is a form of feeding in which one animal takes prey or other food from another that has caught, collected, or otherwise prepared the food, including stored food. The term is also used to describe the stealing of nest material or other inanimate objects from one animal by another.

The kleptoparasite gains either by obtaining prey or other objects that it could not obtain itself, or by saving the time and effort required to obtain it. However, the kleptoparasite may run the risk of injury from the victim if the latter is able to defend its prey.

Kleptoparasitism may be intraspecific (the parasite is the same species as the victim) or interspecific (the parasite is a different species).